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20131028
20131105
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
foreign policy and, boy, did we get reaction from the liberal readership. i wrote one article that caused a largest number of canceled subscriptions in the history of the magazine which i was very proud of. >> what was the writing like? >> it's always been extremely step by step logical. you can read a column by charles about something and you can still disagree with him after you're through with it and then you know you must have a pretty good argument. >> those arguments had conservative columnists like william f. buckley wondering why krauthammer and "the new republic" were not supporting reagan in 1984. >> why don't you give up on the democrats and i was still one of those who wanted to sort of save the soul of the democratic party and maintain this conservative element of which the magazine really was. >> krauthammer filed off a letter to buckley writing, reagan still had, quote, a lot to answer for on foreign policy and his domestic policy was far worse. quote, the catalog of sins we believe the president has committed is too long to recap late here but krauthammer says he privately
on the public? finally, what are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no random -- no benefits, we do not need security. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our methods adaptive? >> it has changed in relatively significant ways. it is a far more diffuse threat than it was 10 or 15 years ago. it is not necessarily align to buy group, but principally by ideology and other driving fact there's, -- driving factors. secondly, the threat seems to progress at times very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today could be on our doorstep tomorrow. lastly, they do not necessarily appear based on their actions in recent actions are indicators of that. big and complex attacks are their goal or their aim to accomplish their objectives. relatively small in comparison attacks that are relatively simple to put together and execute seem to be a preference
friendship ith other countries. if you follow iraq's foreign policy, you would see that the iraqis think independently and not according to the interest of any others. we have a partnership an agreement with the united states. this is something some other countries do not like. that we like it, this is what matters. be believed to have a strong relation within the united states. if others do not agree, it is their problem. they cannot impose anything on the iraqis. if they want to be our friends our friendship does not impose on us being enemies of others. >> how do you respond to critics -- this is not coming from me, but a question from someone else -- say you are consolidating power and this has adversely affected iraq's democratic process? >> the constitution and ruling in iraq gives prerogative. this is something i state clearly. let me know when i act in an unconstitutional way. if i act in a way that is not acceptable to some of our partners, as long as i am committing to respecting the constitution and as long as i use my prerogative in a constitutional way, there should ot be a
states to our conduct of foreign policy, to the defense matters, to economic matters. and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> do you think the snowden leaks have hurt america's ability to defend itself? >> i do. i think he's a traitor. i hope we can catch him at some point and that he receives the justice he deserves. >> and the full interview with dick cheney going to air this afternoon on the lead with jake tapper at 4:00 p.m. eastern. you're not going to want to miss that. also want to bring in christiane amanpour in the london news room talking about the nsa, the spying, of course, the aftermath of the allies really upset about this. one thing you said earlier today that really struck us here is that you said there was a deficit of good will among u.s. allies. and that's part of the reason why they are so so frustrated and angry right now. why is there a deficit of good will among our allies? >> well, it's interesting you just played that clip of former vice president cheney. let's go back to the cheney/bush years which april pex was all the angst and anger over the unite at the iraq
foreign relations committee. fact, he has been a leader and virtually every foreign- policy issue for the united states over the past three decades. this year, he became the first sitting chairman of that committee in over a century to become secretary of state. two weeks ago, i was honored to travel to asia with senator where-- secretary kerry you push key initiatives like the chance to civic -- trans-p acific partnership. he has knowledge and global reach in this leader said position -- leadership position. ladies and gentlemen, let's give a warm welcome to a national hero, and then he would dedicate his life to serve the united states in a tireless and can do dealing with the tough issues that face our world. lease help me welcome my friend secretary of state, john kerry. [applause] >> good morning. thank you. there's a very much. thank you for an extraordinary introduction. based on the introduction, i accept the nomination. [laughter] only kidding. i'm out of that now. you, a couple of months before i was out of the job of being secretary stay, i'm still serving and the u.s.
challenge against our country's foreign policies are not exactly exercising the wisdom of solomen. i'm not so much concerned about the plant spending that will be reduced, as is getting policy that is promote work and dignity in this effort. the house bill would return a food stamp policy to work in order to self food stamp benefits. i recognize that perception sometimes trumps reality to this town. but i hope we can settle while asking people to work the return for food stamp programs is not any form of cruel or unusual punishment. the dignity of work has long been a common theme throughout all the ages. finally, throughout the conference, i'll be working to avoid facing undue regulatory burdens. >>> rep zen tich costa is to finally put the gypsa debate to rest, which as we now understand being a pretty fouled experiment. i look forward to a success chl treatment of this farm bill as we move forward in the next five years. >> the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentle lady from minnesota. >> thank you very much. mr. chairman, i want to first thing our incredible chai
is the embargo still in place? >> well, it's hard to think about more counter productive foreign policy than the u.s. embargo. here we have 180 plus nations in the united nations voting against a country who's supposedly the beacon of liberty around the world in favor of a ruthless brutal dictatorship because of the the embargo. i cannot think of a policy that has served the opposite purpose of the goal towards cuba. i mean, after 50 years of the embargo in place, cuba is not any closer to becoming a democracy than in 1960, so i think it's pretty clear that it is an utter failure. >> this is the 22nd year in a row the u.n. voted on this issue. last year, three voted in favor of the sufficient, this year only two, israel being the second. is the u.s. growing more and more isolated on this issue and what does it signal? >> the tiny island of paolo was the other country that voted last year in favor of the united states. i think the embargo is quite the useful tool for the cuban regime. look at what's going on. it helps the cuban regime to rally the entire world behind them and against the unit
regimes that are in fact very difficult for the united states in foreign policy. so there are many different interrelations here that unfortunately seem to be getting more serious by the day and we have a panel that i think is certainly one of the best panels one could possibly put together to talk about this. the real top experts in the united states on this subject. our first panelist is spike bowman who is a specialist in national security law and policy. most recently he served as the deputy of the national counterintelligence executive. he served before that is the senior research fellow at the national defense university and prior to that he was in the senior executive service federal bureau of investigation is the senior counsel for national security law and is director of the intelligence issues group at the national security branch. please join me in welcoming spike bowman. [applause] >> thank you, john. when we think of organized crime i think most of us incorporated about the east coast of the united states when we look at the crime families and things like that and we t
, you would probably be upset, you could understand it at some level because spying is part of foreign policy, but you are a human being and you would be ticked off and she is. >> united states is not the only country that spies on world leaders. madeline albright said that once she was at the united nations and said. >> rick: a french are ambassador asked her about something she said on a phone call. this is not unusual that people spy. >> a group of soldiers in mosl, injured more than 150, it raises this month's death toll to 545 people killed. a surge in sectarian violence has killed more than 500,000 people around iraq. >>> in line with agreement to eliminate all of the weapons by mid 2014. al jazeera's kimberly dukehart has more. >>> syria is meeting an ambitious deadline set by opcew to destroy its lethal stockpile by next year. syria handed over the detail thursday ahead of its october 27th deadline. opcw is not releasing what their report says but it did say the syrian government disclosed 23 chemical weapon sights, the head said last week that the country has so far been coo
and they are very upset. you think what implications will this have not only on foreign policy and trade but what's preventing them from saying screw you to us. >> you know what's preventing them? we're the exceptional nation. what are you going to do? >> i think president obama has serious mending to do and i don't think he deserves the blame but he has a job ahead of him to rebuild the trust. >> we're witnessing a surveillance industrial complex that is increasingly going rogue. it's broader at home and broader abroad than they told the president. >> what they are doing to us. >> i have to be on record i do believe what the president has said this week and i have to be on the r0rd there's a problem when the nsa doesn't tell the president what they are doing at this high level. >> the fans have been weighing in and saying whether they believe the president was ignorant of what the nsa was doing. 46% said the president probably did know about the program. several ways you can get involved here. the poll is up on the facebook page and also on the cycle.msnbc.com. one of the great legal minds of ou
with the overall direction of the foreign policy in the house and senate bills towards a more market based support. it's important to me that we include that in the farm bill. i'm also hopeful we can move away from other market distorting programs. one of the key issues of this conference must be addressed, country of origin labeling or cool. mandatory government run labeling program is not only trade distorting, but does not demonstrate real benefits. i'm confident we can address differences, come together, and timize market based programs to support our farmers and ranchers. we are far apart, and why does the safety net need reform? because people are getting tangled up and stuck in it. the house addresses this by ending benefits for individuals that, quite honestly, do not qualify for them, allowing us to save billions of dollars without cuts assistance to the families in need. this is not weakening nutrition assistance. rather it's about making the program sustainable over the long term. this is a goal i think we can agree on. i'm looking forward to working together on the shared # goals and r
are the implications of this on how we implement foreign policy. it serves as an overarching of the things i would like to see us cover. i would like to start with the first question on the rent we face and why we need security. if there are no benefits, we do not need security. how has the threat of terrorism changed over the past decade and how have our methods adaptive? >> it has changed in relatively significant ways. it is a far more diffuse threat than it was 10 or 15 years ago. it is not necessarily align to buy group, but principally by ideology and other driving fact there's, -- driving factors. secondly, the threat seems to progress at times very rapidly. what may appear to be a localized threat today could be on our doorstep tomorrow. lastly, they do not necessarily appear based on their actions in recent actions are indicators of that. big and complex attacks are their goal or their aim to accomplish their objectives. relatively small in comparison attacks that are relatively simple to put together and execute seem to be a preference. they have the same tools we all have to communicate in a
around the world with world leaders. in fact, -- every foreign policy issue for the united states over the past three decades. this year he became the first sitting chairman of that committee in over a century to become secretary of state. and just two weeks ago i was honored to travel to asia with senator kerry where we pushed forward key administration initiatives like the trans-pacific partnership. our nation is very lucky to have someone with secretary carries knowledge, and global reach in this leadership position. ladies and gentlemen, let's give a warm welcome to a national hero, a man who has dedicated his life to serve the united states and a tireless can do later who is tackling the tough global issues facing our world. lease help me welcome my friend, secretary of state, john kerry. [applause] >> good morning. thank you. thank you very, very much. thanks so much. thank you, penny, for an extraordinary introduction, and based on that introduction i accept the nomination. [laughter] only kidding. i'm out of that now. i'm out of that now. i'll tell you, about a couple months, b
the case against the challenge for our countries foreign-policy challenges without exercising the risk. we need to reform the food stamp program with better policies. withnot as much concerned programs as i am with policies. the house bill would simply return the food stamp policy to the intent that resident clinton and the congress at that time encouraged individuals to work to receive those benefits. i recognize perception sometimes trumps reality in this town but i hope that asking people to work in return for food stamp not any form of cruel and unusual punishment. the dignity of work has been a common theme throughout the ages. i will be working to avoid placing undue regulatory burdens on our representatives and i want to put the gypsy the -- to rest, and mandatory country of origin labeling has proven to be a failed experiment. i look forward to successful completion of this farm bill so that we can have the uncertainty -- the certainty that our farmers and ranchers deserve. >> the gentleman yields back, the chair recognizes the gentlelady from minnesota. >> thank you very much, mr.
the domain of foreign policy, whether the central government is on board because the prime minister of pakistan is going to be briefed by his cabinet in the next few hours and is going to be some sort of outcome from that particular meeting with the prime minister later tonight. >> we will continue to follow that, and thank you. elections turn violent sunday in parts of kosovo and masked men burst in throwing tear gas and smashing ballot boxes and the police were across the city and the first time they are voting in local elections since they declared independence in 2008. when the storm season calms and dangerous exit begins and 50 people are missing after a boat capsized and eight people were rescued and carrying muslims and they are a muslim minority in myanmar and persecuted and 200 people have been killed in violence and hundreds in camps and they tried to flee the country. east of the bay another boat accident killed at least six tourists, a boat capsized and it was over crowded and took on water and sank. the capacity is 150 but there have been more than 200 on board. witness
foreign intelligence services will try to monitor them. they do to so create knowledge about the way policy makers make decisions and so forth. so i think some of that stuff is a little bit overblown on their part but we should always review our intelligence programs and make sure they're not abused and make sure they're used in the most effective ways. jenna: always great to have you on the program. we always cover a loft ground and we appreciate it. thank you. much more on the big story coming up in a moment jon: a stunning new report from the centers for disease control now claiming that even perfectly healthy children are dying from flu complications. let's talk about it with a board certified e.r. physician and l.s.u. shreveport adjunct assistant professor. you always hear the warnings that the elderly and the very young should get the flu shots because they're the most susceptible but there are 7-year-old, 8-year-old children who die and were otherwise healthy. >> it was a little alarming. the c.d.c. came out with a study where they looked over the last few years and i think if
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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